May 27: Unsettled Weather Continues, Daily Links

WEATHER

A few severe thunderstorm warnings were issued yesterday afternoon, but there weren’t any damage reports from those storms.  We have more scattered storms in the forecast this afternoon, and in the forecast every afternoon for the rest of the 7-day forecast:
7 Day PM

This is the type of weather pattern where the Futurecast models don’t do much for in terms of pinning down the exact timing and placement of individual thunderstorms.  As you can see in this series of images, they’re all-over-the-place in terms of where the storms will be at different points during the day (RPM model on the left, BAMS model on the right).
RPM 12P WED RPM 2P WED RPM 4P WED RPM 6P WED RPM 8P WED

Fortunately, our severe weather potential will remain low.  The Storm Prediction Center has included us in a “Marginal Risk” region for severe weather — basically, it means that while there will be a lot of storms within that region, only a few of them will be capable of producing severe weather (in the form of gusty winds):
PAUL SEVERE RISK REGION

The same pattern will repeat itself through the weekend and even into early next week.  Throughout that time frame, the greatest threat of severe weather we’ll encounter will put us in the “Marginal Risk” category again:
PAUL SEVERE WEEKLY

Yes, it’s annoying that we can’t tell you with any degree of certainty whether it will be raining on you in a specific place at a specific time.  It’s just the usual late-spring/early-summer pattern.  Keep both the sunglasses and the umbrella handy.
Picard-Deal

 

LINKS

Lots of weather- and space-related stuff today.  Rejoice, sky-nerds!

  • A large complex of thunderstorms (an MCS, or Mesoscale Convective System) produced more heavy rain around Houston this morning.  Nighttime MCSs are common in the middle of the country, but their development isn’t well-understood.  A new research project is working on that.
  • It’s not just the heavy rain that has caused flooding issues in Texas.  New housing developments in areas prone to weather problems are also an issue.
  • What’s it like to live in the “tornado alley of Tornado Alley“?  A fascinating article.
  • New England is far from immune to hurricanes — Irene and Sandy as recently examples.  But as the climate system warms, those types of storms could have even more of an impact.
  • Another potential impact of the looming El Nino event — famine in West Africa.
  • Big news: NASA’s budget for 2016 includes funding for initiating a mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa.  Nine different instrument packages would be on board to investigate the frozen moon and its subsurface ocean.
  • A tale of four supernovas.  Cool stuff from deep space.
  • If you’re struggling at work, turn on some nature sounds to boost your productivity.  (I don’t think they’ll let do this on the air, though.)

About paulheggen33

Morning meteorologist for WNCN-TV in Raleigh.
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